Radon-Resistant New Construction
Bell-Ayr Builders, LLC utilizes Radon-Resistant Construction Techniques

http://www.epa.gov/radon/rrnc/index.html

Why Should You Build A Home with Radon-Resistant Techniques?

They Make Homes Safer from Radon

  • These construction techniques help block radon from entering the home. The occupants will benefit from lower radon levels in their
    new home.

  • They are easy to upgrade when there is a need to increase the radon reduction.

  • If high radon levels are found, the techniques allow for easy and inexpensive installation of a fan for increased radon reduction in the
    home. Every new home should be tested for radon by the homeowner after occupancy.

  • They are cost-effective for home buyers

  • It is more cost-effective to include radon-resistant techniques while building a home, rather than installing a radon reduction system in
    an existing home.

For example:

  • The cost to include these features is less than the cost to mitigate the home after construction.
  • It is cheaper to install a radon-reduction system during construction than to go back and fix a radon problem identified later.   
    On average, installing radon-resistant features during construction costs about $350-$500.  In contrast, mitigating an existing
    home will typically cost between $1200 - $1500.

  • They may improve the home's energy-efficiency

  • Radon-resistant construction techniques are consistent with state-of-the-art energy-efficient construction.  When using these
    techniques, they result in energy savings and lower utility bills.



What are Radon-resistant construction techniques?

The techniques may vary for different foundations and site requirements, but the basic elements are:

A. Gas Permeable Layer:  
This layer is placed beneath the slab or flooring system to allow the soil gas to move freely underneath the house.
In many cases, the material used is a 4-inch layer of clean gravel.

       B. Plastic Sheeting:  
Plastic sheeting is placed on top of the gas permeable layer and under the slab to help prevent the soil gas from entering the home.
In crawlspaces, the sheeting is placed over the crawlspace floor.

       C.  Sealing and Caulking:  
All openings in the concrete foundation floor are sealed to reduce soil gas entry into the home.

       D.  Vent Pipe:  
A 3- or 4-inch gas-tight or PVC pipe (commonly used for plumbing) runs from the gas permeable layer through the house to the roof
to safely vent radon and other soil gases above the house.

       E. Junction Box:
    An electrical junction box is installed in case an electric venting fan is needed later.

    Fan:
    Install a fan to turn a passive RRNC system into an active system when a radon test shows elevated levels of radon in the home.
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Home
About Us
Recent News
Our Homes
Specifications
Products
FAQ
Advantages
Process
Environmental
Additions
Services
Teardowns
Resources
ENERGY STAR
Financing
Calculators
Location
Contact Us